The Impact of Culture

Traditionally, brand messaging has been brand-centric, relying on their defining attributes and benefits as selling points. But as cultural events gain traction among audiences, there is a unique opportunity for brands to make meaningful connections with consumers through shared perspectives. But can aligning with cultural events positively impact a brands reputation? The answer is, it depends.

There is no one-size-fits-all model for making your brand culturally relevant. As an industry, we need to understand how affiliations through culture can move the needle on a consumers’ perception of a brand.

The Impact of Culture is a new global media trial from Twitter, MAGNA, IPG Media Lab, and Media Experts that decodes the Canadian consumer’s perception of brand involvement in culture, and how it sways consumer spending.

Some key highlights include:

 

  • CULTURAL RELEVANCE HOLDS PURCHASE POWER
    When it comes to making purchase decisions, while price and quality is still king, contributing to 46% of purchase decisions, cultural involvement is surprisingly important at 24%. Of the different types of cultural involvement, brands that promote social issues have the most impact on consumer spend.

 

  • BRANDS SHOULD STAND UP FOR SOCIAL ISSUES
    51% of consumers feel it’s important for brands to be involved in social movements, such as gender equality and fair trade.

 

  • POP CULTURE COUNTS
    37% of consumers appreciate when a brand associates itself with pop culture events/moments, everything from the Oscars and the Super Bowl right down to #tacotuesday.

 

  • CULTURE IS KEY, BUT GIVING BACK IS KING
    Consumers feel brands should be philanthropic, with 63% agreeing they should give back to the community and 60% voicing they should support social issues that benefit everyone.

 

  • INCLUSION IS IMPERATIVE
    61% of Canadian consumers said that brands seeking to be more culturally relevant should be inclusive of all types of people (this compared to only 51% of Americans).

 

  • CELEBS HOLD LITTLE SWAY
    Turns out that celebs are not the biggest culture drivers. Celebrity endorsements were the least popular way consumers believe brands can become more culturally relevant.

 

Download the infographic or full report..